Derek Haines : Eyes That Could Kill

Eyes That Could Kill

When being abducted once, is not enough.

Langley Garrett discovers Greek gods and the myths and legends that surround the lost city of Atlantis are not ancient history to those who arrange his abduction. Within hours of being drugged and restrained, he finds himself imprisoned on a remote island, with no clue as to why he was kidnapped.

The Sons of Cleito, a mysterious group whose ideology and beliefs are guided by Greek mythology, believe he is a spirit, crucial to their  future, and immediately begin his indoctrination process – starting with explicit evidence that his wife is not only a member of The Sons, but also that she is an adulteress, and has been working with their enemies to destroy The Sons of Cleito.

Yet, before he has time to understand the ugly truth about his wife, he is abducted once again during a violent commando raid on the island and is rushed aboard a submarine for questioning – about his wife, and a long forgotten letter from his dead mother. Garrett learns very quickly that he is in deep trouble, but has no clue as to why he is being accused of involvement in an international terrorist organization. Later however, after weeks of interrogation and beatings in a desert prison, all he knows with any degree of certainty, is that he will be lucky to stay alive for very much longer.

Read about Langley Garret’s abductions, mysterious misfortunes, Greek mythology, gods, deities and eternal secrets – and why history can only ever repeat, in Eyes That Could Kill, a mystery thriller.

 

Amazon Review:  “I love a story that starts with “The internal organs located in and around the belly, while serving most notably as an efficient set of composting and sewerage services, happen to possess another completely unrelated and totally mystical function…”, because… I’ve recently co-written a book (called mBraining) about how Neuroscience has uncovered that we have complex, adaptive and functional neural networks or ‘brains’ in the heart and gut regions. And guided by the neuroscience, my colleague and I have completed 2.5 years of behavioral modeling research on the core competencies of these brains. And yes, the gut brain does indeed have deeply intuitive intelligence and wisdom.

So this story resounds with incredible insights into how we as humans process our world, how our guts and inner visceral organs, communicate to us to let us know about threats and dangers. The author has captured well the sense of this inner knowing, its upsides and downsides. And this makes the story so much more engaging and philosophically insightful.

It’s a great read, keeps you guessing and involved. It’s also quite a deep read, exploring the structure of human and societal power structures, our drives for wealth, acceptance, power and belief. I enjoyed it immensely and look forward to reading more by this author.”

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